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The United States Constitution: Federalists v. Anti-Federalists

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❶The Expense of The New Government.

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The Anti-Federalist Papers


Scotland and England — A Case in Point. A Consolidated Government Is a Tyranny. The Expense of The New Government. Rhode Island Is Right! What Does History Teach? Why The Articles Failed. Objections to a Standing Army. Objections to National Control of the Militia. Federal Taxation and the Doctrine of Implied Powers.

The Problem of Concurrent Taxation. Federal Taxing Power must Be Restrained. Representation and Internal Taxation. Factions and the Constitution. Some Reactions to Federalist Arguments. On the Motivations and Authority of the Founding Fathers. Where Then Is the Restraint? On the Guarantee of Congressional Biennial Elections. A Plea for the Right of Recall. As in the previous lesson, encourage students to reason out the meanings of words they do not know.

The students will deeply understand the major arguments concerning the ratification of the US Constitution. This understanding will be built upon close analysis of the Federalist Papers and Anti-Federalist Papers. The students will demonstrate their understanding in both writing and speaking. Tell the students that now they get to apply their knowledge and understanding of the Federalist and Anti-Federalist arguments.

They will need to select a debate moderator from within their group and divide the remaining students into Federalists and Anti-Federalists. As a group they will write questions based on the issues presented in the primary documents.

They will also script responses from both sides based solely on what is written in the documents. This is not an actual debate but rather a scripted presentation for the sake of making arguments that the authors of these documents would have made in a debate format. In the next lesson the groups will present their debates for the class. Students will be sitting with the same critical thinking group as in the previous two lessons. All of the students should have copies of the excerpts from the Federalist Papers and the Anti-Federalist Papers as well as the United States Constitution as reference materials.

The students will demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of the Federalist and Anti-Federalist arguments. This is not an actual debate but a scripted presentation making arguments that the authors of these documents would have made in a debate format. Students will be sitting with the same critical thinking groups as in the previous three lessons. Skip to main content.

Content Type Essay Spotlight on: The United States Constitution: Anti-Federalists by Tim Bailey. Lesson 1 Objective Today students will participate as members of a critical thinking group and "read like a detective" in order to analyze the arguments made by the Federalists in favor of ratifying the new US Constitution.

Materials Federalist Papers 1, 10, 51, and 84 excerpts. The full text of all the Federalist Papers are available online at the Library of Congress.

Procedure First, a caution: Divide the class into groups of three to five students. These will be the "critical thinking groups" for the next several days. Discuss the information in the introduction. The students need to at least be familiar with the failure of the Articles of Confederation, the Constitutional Convention, and the writing of the US Constitution. Hand out the four excerpts from Federalist Papers 1, 10, 51, and If possible have a copy up on a document projector so that everyone can see it and you can refer to it easily.

This is done by having the students follow along silently while the teacher begins reading aloud. The teacher models prosody, inflection, and punctuation. The teacher then asks the class to join in with the reading after a few sentences while the teacher continues to read along with the students, still serving as the model for the class.

This technique will support struggling readers as well as English language learners ELL. Ask the students a critical-analysis question for each of the Federalist Papers. Federalist Paper 1 states that "History will teach us. Now put those thoughts into your own words.

Answers will vary, but in the end the students should conclude that groups interested in "the rights of the people" more often end up as "tyrants. Answers will vary, but in the end the students should conclude that the "effects" include "a division of society," and the remedy is the formation of "a republic. Federalist Paper 51 states, "If men were angels, no government would be necessary.

What words does the author use to answer this question? Answers will vary, but in the end the students should conclude that "such devices [separation of powers] should be necessary to control the abuses of government" and "you must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place oblige it to control itself. Federalist Paper 84 states that a bill of rights in the Constitution is not necessary.

What arguments does the author make to back up this statement? Discuss final conclusions and clarify points of confusion.

We want students to be challenged, not overwhelmed. Lesson 2 Objective Today students will participate as members of a critical thinking group and "read like a detective" in order to analyze the arguments made by the Anti-Federalists in opposition to ratifying the new US Constitution.

Introduction Review the background information from the last lesson. Materials Anti-Federalist Papers 1, 9, 46, and 84 excerpts. The Antifederalist Papers East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, Unlike the Federalist Papers, the essays by Anti-Federalists were not conceived of as a unified series.

US Constitution, Overhead projector or other display method Vocabulary As in the previous lesson, encourage students to reason out the meanings of words they do not know. Students should sit with their critical thinking groups from the last lesson. Hand out the four excerpts from Anti-Federalist Papers 1, 9, 46, and The teacher now asks the students a critical analysis question for each of the Anti-Federalist Papers.

Anti-Federalist Paper 1 states that "In order to deceive them.


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The Anti-Federalists - The Founding Fathers were the men recognized for drafting the United States Constitution and are often viewed as an unselfish group of men who shared a singular belief about how government should work.

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Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists Essay - Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists From the development of the American Constitution was a battle between two opposing political philosophies. America’s best political minds gathered in Philadelphia and other cities in the Northeast in order to find common ground in a governmental structure.

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Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists Essay The creation of the Constitution was accompanied by the heat debate concerning the future of the US and its structure. Basically, these debates led to the creation of two opposing camps. Federalist vs. Anti-Federalist The road to accepting the Constitution of the United States was neither easy nor predetermined. In fact during and after its drafting a wide-ranging debate was held between those who supported the Constitution, the.

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Federalists vs. The Anti-Federalists Uploaded by cevster on Dec 29, The Federalists vs. The Anti-Federalists When the revolutionary war was over, the American colonists had found themselves free of British domination. The Anti-Federalist Papers. During the period from the drafting and proposal of the federal Constitution in September, , to its ratification in there was an intense debate on ratification.